Becoming a Social IT Organization

Earlier this year harmon.ie produced a list of the most socially active group of CIOs in the Fortune 250 and Global 250.  It was shocking to me that only 10% of the Fortune 250 CIOs are themselves social.  Shocking because we have entered a new era of computing where social connectivity is crucial to a company’s brand awareness, cultivating influencers and ultimately reaching the consumer.   Not only are our customers moving in this direction, social networking is completely changing the way knowledge is shared and empowering the masses with knowledge that was once held by a select few.  Our key assets as an IT organization are knowledge, innovation and influence.  It is not easy to find the right information or the knowledgeable person in a big company like Intel.

In just a few short weeks on Twitter, I’ve seen how easy it is to quickly gain key insights and apply only what is most relevant to me.  Innovation is also changing with more and more innovation coming from crowdsourcing. Quirky, founded in 2009, has created hundreds of successful products all crowd sourced.  Two new products a week is the velocity enabled by empowering the masses.  Who is influencing is changing, no longer is the person with the big title the key influencer in a community.  The crowd has usurped this role. Thus, I conclude we all need to become social.

Being a new CIO, I made a commitment to myself that I would be a part of the 10% and bring many IT professionals along with me.  Join me in this journey.  We may have a lot to learn but it will be worth the effort if we’re successful in achieving and maintaining our company’s competitive edge.

Follow me on twitter @KimSStevenson #IntelCIO #IntelIT

Engage me in dialogue and discussion around IT Leadership in the Intel Open Port IT community.

http://communities.intel.com/community/openportit

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Kim Stevenson

About Kim Stevenson

Kimberly "Kim" Stevenson is vice president and Chief Information Officer (CIO) of Intel Corporation. She is responsible for the corporate-wide use of Information Technology (IT). Intel's IT organization delivers leading technology solutions and services that enable Intel's business strategies for growth and efficiency. The IT organization is comprised of over 6,000 IT professionals worldwide. Previously, Stevenson was vice president and general manager of Intel's Global IT Operations and Services. In this role she led both the strategic and tactical support of Intel's world-wide infrastructure components, including Data Centers, Network and Telecommunications, Enterprise Application Support, Client computing and a 24x7 internal Service Desk.