Intel, Industry Highlights Latest Collaboration at KuberCon


My hometown of Portland, Oregon is home this week to the first ever KuberCon Launch event bringing together the Kubernetes ecosystem at OSCON. While the industry celebrates the delivery of Kubernetes 1.0 and formation of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, this week is also an opportunity to gauge the state of the development around open source container solutions.

Why so much attention on containers? Basically, it is because containers help software developers and infrastructure operators at the same time.  This tech will help put mainstream data centers and developers on the road to the advanced, easy-to-consume, easy to ship and run, hyperscale technologies that are a hallmark of the world’s largest and most sophisticated cloud data centers. The container approach, packages up applications and software libraries to create units of computing that are both scalable and portable—two keys to the agile data center.  With the addition of Kubernetes and other key tech like Mesos, the orchestration and scheduling of the containers is making the impossible now simple.

This is a topic close to the hearts of many people at Intel. We are an active participant in the ecosystem that is working to bring the container model to a wide range of users and data centers as part of our broader strategy for standards based stack delivery for software defined infrastructure.  This involvement was evidenced earlier this year through our collaborations with both CoreOS andDocker, two leading software players in this space, as well as our leadership engagement in the new Open Container Project.

As part of the effort to advance the container cause, Intel is highlighting the latest advancements in our CoreOS collaboration to advance and optimize the Tectonic stack, a commercial distribution of Kubernetes plus CoreOS software. At KuberCon, Intel, Redapt, Supermicro and CoreOS are showing a Tectonic rack running on bare metal highlighting the orchestration and portability that Tectonic provides to data center workloads.  Local rock-star company Jive has been very successful in running their workloads on this platform showing that their app can move between public cloud and on-premise bare metal cloud.  We’re also announcing extensions of our collaboration with CoreOS to drive broad developer training for Tectonic and title sponsorship in CoreOS’s Tectonic Summit event planned for December 2nd and 3rd in New York. For details, check out the CoreOS news release.

We’re also featuring an integration of an OpenStack environment running Kubernetes based containers within an enterprise ready appliance.  This collaboration with Mirantis, Redapt and Dell highlights the industry’s work to drive open source SDI stacks into solutions that address enterprise customer needs for simpler to deploy solutions and demonstrate the progress that the industry has made inintegrating Kubernetes with OpenStack as it reaches 1.0.

Our final demonstration features a new software and hardware collaboration with Mesosphere, the company behind much of the engineering for Mesos which provides the container scheduling for Twitter, Apple Siri, AirBnB among other digital giants.  Here, we’ve worked to integrate Mesosphere’s DCOS platform with Kubernetes on a curated and optimized hardware stack supplied by Quanta.  This highlights yet another example of an open source SDI stack integrating efficient container based virtualization to drive the portability and orchestration of hyperscale.

For a closer look at Intel’s focus on standards-based innovation for the software-defined infrastructure stack, check out my upcoming presentation at the Intel Developer Forum (Intel IDF). I’ll be detailing further advancements in our industry collaborations in delivery of SDI to the masses as well as going deeper in the technologies Intel is integrating into data center infrastructure to optimize SDI stacks for global workload requirements.