4 Questions You Should be Asking as You Prep Your Mobile Strategy for 2014

As industry experts roll out their end-of-year retrospectives and their predictions for 2014, one thing is obvious:  mobile will continue to have a significantly disruptive effect on business in the upcoming year. Forbes recently predicted that in 2014, businesses will be "putting remote wipe and encryption software on personal devices, as well as mobile virtual workspaces that separate work data in a separate, encrypted area on a user’s personal device;" and  dealing with blurred boundaries as "employees complete work during evening and weekend hours, as well as on vacation."

As you examine your organization's 2013 internal mobile projects and prepare for 2014, what are the questions you should be asking yourself? The analysts at IDC Health Insights offer the following guidelines:

With mobility now a core attribute of IT strategy rather than an optional add-on, there are many best practices and key areas of concern that companies need to contemplate when approaching their mobility strategies. Important questions that companies need to ask themselves include:

  • Will we strictly issue company devices or permit a bring-your- own-device (BYOD) environment? How will this decision affect data and network security? How will it affect the usability of existing and future software purchases in need of support on multiple operating systems?

  • What tasks will be performed on the device? Companies need to weigh the long-term pros and cons of device decisions. While some devices might be best suited to one environment (i.e., multimedia display in the field), other devices may better support other areas of the business (i.e., back-office work, document creation).

  • Where should we locate our data? How sensitive is the data being used? Does local storage of information on the device make sense to improve performance and offline availability, or is the data better suited to the cloud for security reasons?

  • How long must the battery last per charge? Will the device be used by people with regular access to electrical outlets, or must the battery last from 8 hours to 12 hours per charge for employees out in the field?

In addition to these questions, one of the most important topics that companies need to address is mobile device management. Companies are integrating mobile capabilities into all aspects of the business, and as the business mobilizes its employees, and more importantly, their data, the ability to remotely secure, lock/unlock, and wipe data from a mobile device will become critically important to corporate security and protection of data covered. IDC Health Insights expects investment in remote mobile device management and security software to experience significant uplift over the next few years.

In the comments section, tell us: Which mobile trends do you predict will have a disruptive impact on business in 2014?

Want more information on mobile trends? Check out the attached IDC Health Insights' whitepaper on mobility in the life sciences industry.

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