Access Your Data Anytime, Anywhere With Intel ReadyMode Technology

Back in 1993, when the first 7200-RPM hard drives hit the market, I imagine people thought they could never fill up its jaw-dropping 2.1GB capacity. Of course, that was before the era of MP3s and digital photos, and any videos you had were on VHS or Beta (or possibly laserdisc).

Today, desktop PCs like the ASUS K20CE* mini PC come with up to 3TB SSD drive to accommodate users’ massive collections of HD videos, photos, eBooks, recorded TV, and other huge files. That’s terabytes! Some feature even more storage.

But how do you access these files away from home? You could use one of the many cloud services on the market; however, if you have lots of personal photos and videos, or large documents and files from work, you’ll quickly reach the cap on the free capacity and have to start paying monthly subscription fees. Plus, you’d need to remember to upload files that you might want to access later to the cloud, and if you want to change services, move your files digitally from one network to another, which can be a hassle, not to mention a security concern.

desktop.png

Access your data anytime, anywhere

A better option would be to take advantage of Intel ReadyMode Technology (Intel RMT) and third-party remote access software such as Splashtop, Teamviewer, or Microsoft Remote Desktop to turn your desktop PC into an always-available “personal cloud” that lets you access all of your files on your other devices, such as your smartphone or tablet.

“With RMT, your data is stored safely in your home computer so you don’t have to worry about people hacking into it. You can access it through remote log on or through VPN,” said Fred Huang, Product Manager, ASUS Desktop Division. “It’s a better way to access your personal files that exists today with ASUS systems running Intel RMT.”

Intel RMT replaces the traditional PC sleep state with a quiet, low power, OS-active state that allows PCs to remain connected, up-to-date, and instantly available when not in use. Plus, it allows background applications—like remote access software—to run with the display off while consuming a fraction of electricity it normally would when fully powered on.

For home PCs, this means you can get the convenience of anytime, cloud-like access to your files without a cloud-service bill, as well as the ability to share it outside your own personal login.

Family with AIO.jpg

“Cloud-based storage is usually more personal, so you might have a different account from your spouse or family member, but with a home hub PC, it can be one shared account that the whole family can access,” adds Huang.

For businesses, Intel RMT allows employees to use remote access to get to their work files from anywhere without the need for their desktops to remain fully awake and consuming power. Across a large enterprise, that kind of power savings really adds up.

Another business benefit: desktops with Intel RMT enable automatic backups and nightly system health checks to happen efficiently during off hours without waking the machines—saving power while protecting files and uptime.

The perfect home (and work) desktop

ASUS desktop PC allow users to do everything from daily tasks to playing 4K ultra HD video with enhanced energy efficiency, better productivity and powerful performance across all its form factors. Other highlights include instant logins, voice activation, and instant sync and notifications.

And don’t forget about the gamers. RMT can help support game downloads and streaming sessions without wasting a lot of energy. Gamers can also choose to run updates and applications in the background 24/7, or overnight, and save time and energy by being connected to an energy-efficient smart home hub. Take a look at this recap video of the always available PC from IDF 2015 last month.

In addition to the ASUS K20 mentioned above, Intel RMT will also be featured by the future series or succeeding models for ASUS M32AD* tower PC, ASUS Zen AiO Z240IC* All-in-One, and the ASUS E510* mini PC.

Want to find out more about what Intel Ready Mode can do? Visit: www.intel.com/readymode.