Enabling Community and Patient-Centred Care Using Predictive Analytics

There’s a lot of talk about Big Data in healthcare right now but for me the value of Big Data is not in the size of the data at all, the real value is in the analytics and what that can deliver to the patient. Healthcare reform is underpinned by a shift to value-based care where identifying best care, best treatment and best prognosis are all driven by business intelligence and business analytics.

I want to share my thoughts on this in a little more detail from a presentation I gave at the NHS England Health and Care Innovation Expo in Manchester, where Intel and Oracle highlighted some of the great work happening around identifying healthcare needs using predictive analytics.

Opportunities for Data Use in Healthcare are Rich

Everywhere I look in healthcare there seems to be an abundance of data, for example, it’s estimated that the average hospital generates 665TB of data annually. But it’s not just the volume of data that presents challenges, the variety of data means that the opportunities for its use are rich but often tempered by some 80 percent of that data being unstructured. Think X-rays, CT and 3D MRI scans as just one area where technology has vastly improved the quality of delivery of these services - but with a consequential exponential growth in resulting data.

Does more data really bring better care though? I’d argue that it’s the analysis of data that holds the key to solving some of the big challenges faced by providers across the world rather than how much data can be captured or accessed. With that in mind Intel and Oracle are working to help providers integrate, store and analyse data in better ways to deliver improved patient outcomes, including:

  • Enabling early intervention and prevention
  • Providing care designed for the individual
  • Enhancing access to the care for the underserved

Our approach to developing solutions in this area encompasses several areas on the Big Data stack. There’s the core technology which covers the CPU’s, SSD, Flash, Fabrics, Networking and Security. And then there’s the investment in the Big Data platform which talks to the proliferation of Hadoop by making it easier to deploy. Finally, but no less important, are the analytics tools and utilities which help broaden analysis and accelerate application development.

Oracle and Project O-sarean Empowers Citizens

I’d like to highlight a couple of great examples where data sharing is helping to deliver active patient management. Oracle has played a part in the successful Project O-sarean in the Basque Country where the regional public healthcare system covers some 2.1m inhabitants with 80 percent of patient interactions related to chronic diseases. It has been predicted that by 2020 healthcare expenditure would need to double if systems and processes did not change. The results of this new multi-channel health service, powered by voluminous amounts of data, are impressive and include:

  • Empowered citizens with access to Personal Health records
  • Active patient monitoring for those with chronic diseases
  • Health and drug advisory service providing evidence-based advice

The clinician benefits too as 11 acute hospitals, 4 chronic hospitals, 4 mental health hospitals, 1,850 GPs and 820 pharmacies are connected using Oracle solutions to collaborate through the sharing and analysis of patient data. This is a fantastic example of interoperability in healthcare. (Download a PDF from Oracle for more information on the Project O-sarean).

Intel helps Partners Deliver Predictive Analytics Innovations

Here at Intel we’ve been working with MimoCare to improve support for independent living with the Intel® Intelligent Gateway™. Through the use of sensors MimoCare technology will help the elderly remain safe living independently in their homes for longer. The use of analytics to identify normal patterns of behavior and predict events means that trigger alerts can be set at the family, friends and carers while the consolidation of aggregated data can help wider clinical research too. Read more on the great work of MimoCare and Intel’s role in the Internet of Things in Healthcare here.

I think you’ll find a recent blog by my colleague, Malcolm Linington, interesting too – he takes a look at how GPC are innovating to help guide wound care specialists to deliver the most effective treatment plan possible, develop standardized assessment practices, enhances clinical-based decision-making and ultimately provides cost-savings by streamlining wound care procedures.

I’m excited to share these stories with you as I feel we are only at the start of what is going to be a fantastic journey of using predictive analytics in healthcare. It would be great to hear about some of your examples so please do tweet us via @intelhealth or register and post a comment below.

Find Claire Medd RGN BSc (Hons) on LinkedIn.

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