How can you afford to NOT use SSDs?

“Intel SSDs are too expensive!”

“The performance of an SSD won’t be noticed by my users.”

“Intel SSDs will wear out too fast!”

"I don’t have time to learn about deploying SSDs!”

I’ve heard statements like this for years, and do I ever have a story to share – the story of Intel’s adoption of Intel® Solid-State Drives (Intel® SSDs).

Before I tell you more, I would like to introduce myself.  I am currently a Client SSD Solutions Architect in Intel’s Non-Volatile Memory Solutions Group (the SSD group).   Prior to joining this group last year, I was in Information Technology (IT) at Intel for 26 years.  The last seven years in IT were spent in a client research and pathfinding role where I investigated new technologies and how they could be applied inside of Intel to improve employee productivity.

I can still remember the day in late 2007 when I first plugged in an Intel SSD into my laptop.  I giggled.  A lot.  And that’s what sparked my passion for SSDs.  I completed many lab tests, research efforts and pilot deployments in my role, which led to the mainstream adoption of Intel SSDs within Intel.  That’s the short version.  More detail is documented in a series of white papers published through our IT@Intel Program.  If you’d like to read more about our SSD adoption journey, here are the papers:

I’ve answered many technical and business-related questions related to SSDs over the years.  Questions, and assumptions, like the four at the top of this blog, and perhaps one hundred others.  But the question I’ve been asked more than any other is, “how can you afford to deploy SSDs when they cost so much compared to hard drives?”  I won’t go in to the detail in this introductory blog, but I will give you a hint, point you to our Total Cost of Ownership estimator and ask, “how can you afford to NOT use SSDs?”

I plan to cover a variety of client SSD topics in future blogs.  I have a lot of info that I would like to share about the adoption of SSDs within Intel, and about the technology and products in general.  If you are interested in a specific topic, please make a suggestion and I will use your input to guide future blogs.

Thanks for your time!

Doug
intel.com/ssd