Mobility Week: 5 Questions for Bradley Dick, Chief Information Officer, Resurgens Orthopaedics

Bradley Dick is Chief Information Officer at Resurgens Orthopaedics, one of the largest orthopedics practices in the country with 97 orthopedic surgeons, 21 locations in an around metro Atlanta, six outpatient surgery centers, and nine imaging facilities. We recently caught up with him to get his thoughts on his organization’s mobile technology strategy and why mobile technology is growing in healthcare.

Intel: What is the mobile strategy for your organization?

Dick: Our mobile strategy is to empower the physician at the point of care. It’s not tied to a particular device. Data is really the power of mobile healthcare technology and the key is to get the data to the practitioner at the point of care so they can make decisions and not impact the workflow. We found that with any type of solution, if it significantly impacts workflow it will not be successful.

Intel: What types of solutions have you successfully implemented recently?

Dick: The most recent solution we implemented is the Allscripts TouchWorks EHR for Windows 8. We wanted a solution that would enable the provider to have the entire episode of care available to them; everything starting when the patient walked into the building to the time they left the facility. Other solutions did not have the same multi-tasking functionality or support for other applications.

Intel: What has helped drive the growth of mobile technology in healthcare?

Dick: One of the big drivers of mobile healthcare technology is the ubiquity of bandwidth. With great bandwidth available, it opens us up to a lot of interesting possibilities. A lot of the big data systems we are starting to look at are going to be key in the mobile space because behind the scenes, we have to get that data to the clinician at the point of care. That’s always been the big challenge. Data is only as good as it is integrated into the actual care of the patient and bandwidth makes that possible.

Intel: What should CIOs be thinking about when it comes to mobile technology?

Dick: Healthcare CIOs should be thinking about the workflows of their clinicians and look to find ways that they can make those workflows more efficient. Trust me, physicians are using mobile devices and want to have that technology and the data. The key is to collaborate with providers and care coordinators to find the right tools. It will be much more successful if you integrate them into the process rather than come up with a process on your own.

Intel: What keeps you up at night when it comes to healthcare technology?

Dick: What keeps me up at night is the worry that we are not innovating enough. We have been focusing on regulatory compliance so much I don’t think we are innovating. EHRs are not innovation. We need to start seeing the smaller companies introduce solutions that we can integrate into our systems and have some sort of interoperability. Right now it’s almost impossible for the small companies to get our attention because we know they cannot integrate into our systems.