More than 100 Days to Make a Decision

More than one-hundred days. That’s the average time–from inspiration to transaction–it takes a U.S. consumer to make a decision about buying home interior or exterior paint. As shared last week by Tanuja Singeetham, Vice-President of Marketing and eBusiness for Masco Coatings, the home of the Behr and Kilz paint brands, at WPP’s Global Retail Forum.

More than one-hundred days.

In excess of three months.

To make a decision about paint.

Actually, the 100+ day timeline is not surprising to anyone who’s ever thought about a major interior project–and then gone to the web or the store. What might be surprising is that it’s not two-hundred days.

As Tanuja explained, paint sellers have always sold paint according to product benefits:  Durability, washability, gloss, color.

And color.

We’ve all seen the rack of color chips. And squinted under the florescent lights to decide whether we loved more the Polar Bear White or the Frost White. The result has not been a walk to the register, but indecision.

And, if it’s the Polar Bear White, is that better with the Kombucha or the Wabi-Sabi?

Oh my.

Pupils dilate. Heart rates accelerate.  Shoulders sag. She doubles down and the color chips now cover the kitchen table.  He bails.

The decision scientists call it cognitive stress. The retail buzzword of the day calls it friction.

Either way, in paint decision-making, it takes more than one hundred days, on average, to reach the register.

What if you could cut the stress, remove the friction, and cut that decision time in half or more? What if you could watch merchandise turns run down the runway and rise?

It’s why Tanuja and team began selling paint according to what the consumer wanted to achieve. In most cases, a specific feeling.

Relaxed and calming. Bold and dramatic. Warm and friendly.

Along with all kinds of how-to-put-it-together ideas and inspirations. Open it up on your smartphone:  http://colordiscovery.behr.com/welcome.

How will you invent on behalf of your shopper today?

#IamIntel

Published on Categories RetailTags , ,
Jon Stine

About Jon Stine

Global Director Retail Sales at Intel. Jon Stine leads Intel’s global sales and strategy for the retail, hospitality, and consumer goods industry sectors. His CV includes leadership of North American retail consulting practice for Cisco Systems, and a prior stint at Intel, where he founded the company’s sales and marketing focus on the retail industry. His perspective on technology’s value in the industry has been shaped by advisory and project engagements in the United States, across the European Union, and in India, Australia, and the People’s Republic of China, and from 15 years of executive sales and marketing experience in the U.S. apparel industry, working with the nation’s leading department and specialty stores. At Intel, his current areas of research and engagement include the future of the store in this new digital age; how and where retailers turn data into competitive advantage; the role of technology within the new cross-channel shopper journey, and, the critical business and IT capabilities that industry success will demand going forward.