Safeguarding the Smart City of the Future

This is the second installment (#2 of 4) of the - Smart Cities Tech Innovation Series

Click here to view: blog #3

To view more posts within the series click here: Smart Cities Series

In the age of smart cities, it’s an unavoidable truth that although technology can deliver new and amazing capabilities, it can also potentially be a disruptive force. That’s why security is a major focus within the development of Internet of Things.  It is important to use integrated technologies to address some of the security challenges that can emerge in connected cities.

While social media has evolved the experience of events (both big and small) by virtually connecting people, new potential threats have surfaced as a result. When the world’s eyes are on major events like,  the 2012 Olympic Games in London or the 2014 World Cups in Rio de Janeiro, protest groups may try to make the most of this global attention.

It’s not just major world events that are susceptible to such disturbances.  An unfortunate Dutch teenager found this out when their not-so-sweet 16th birthday party crashed by 3,000 people after the event announcement went viral on Facebook. This small event invitation spread wider and wider on social media, resulting in large crowds gathering and eventually police arriving to the scene in riot gear.  Cases like this are rare, but I mention it because city authorities and security services have learned lessons from it. Intel is working with authorities to safeguard against threats like these. We’re bringing together new tools, connected to the Internet of Things. From the devices in our hands and the sensors on our streets to the gateways, servers and cloud-based management platforms used to orchestrate complex security networks, innovative tech is developing on behalf of city security It’s certainly a far cry from traditional measures like simple CCTV networks. By combining inputs from different sources and various types of tech acquisitions in real time, Intel is pioneering “joined-up” security solutions. As mentioned, social media can be part of the solution as well as the challenge.  By gathering data from public networks like Twitter and FourSquare, police forces can now track situations as they unfold. And support for these measures exists: an Intel survey found that 61 percent of Americans believe it’s worthwhile for a connected city to gather anonymous information about people – that is, if the data is then used to benefit the area.

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In this way, authorities in command centers now have access to this up-to-date intelligence.  The ability to use Big Data analytics can be used to predict where trouble may occur so that preventative measures can be taken ahead of time. The technology is already showing results in pilots around the world. In one city in Europe, for example, Intel is working with local authorities to police a 400 meter strip with around 50 bars that attract20,000+ visitors each weekend. Using a system that integrates social media monitoring, light sensors, and sound-monitoring technologies, Intel is harnessing the full IoT ecosystem to help the city improve safety, reduce security and lower maintenance costs and turn a thriving event into an even more economically and viable phenomenon for the city.

As smart cities grow, security remains the number one priority for city leaders. By supplying the necessary tools and the expertise, Intel is helping these cities harness the Internet of Things to keep city dwellers safe.

To continue the conversation, let's connect on Twitter @DawnOlsen

Dawn Olsen

Global Sales Director

Government Enterprise, Intel

This is the second installment (#2 of 4) of the - Smart Cities Tech Innovation Series

Click here to view: blog #3

To view more posts within the series click here: Smart Cities Series